———–I-WALK-THE-LINE———-

straight_and_narrowSome years ago when I was spending my summers on the farm with my grandparents, occasionally I would take off on my green banana bike and pedal 3 miles down the gravel road to visit my Aunt Jean. Living on a neighboring farm, Aunt Jean and her sister Aunt Josephine would take turns feeding the farm hands and I could learn a lot listening to the conversations at the dinner table. After hearing many stories and filling my belly with homemade bread and plenty of home-cooking, the farm hands would go back to their chores and I would leave the kitchen to escape dish duty and find Aunt Jean’ stack of 45’s. I’d fire up the old record player, place the vinyl on the turntable and listen to a song recorded by Johnny Cash: “I Walk the Line.”

 
In the song, ole Johnny had fallen in love and decided he would realign his life on the straight and narrow. Of course we all know saying and doing are two different things and usually it takes a lot of work! The greatest love we experience here on this earth is one of choice and to achieve this great measure of love, we have to make sacrifices.

 
As we here in the Gospel reading today, we always have a choice. Clothe me, feed me, bring me in out of the weather and give me something to drink. All of these requests ask us to sacrifice our time and money. A person with faith will want to help others. But by helping in these ways, are we just barely scratching the surface resolving their apparent needs or are we taking the time to look deeper. Have they simply had some bad breaks in life or is it their brokenness that keeps repeating these symptoms over and over again? It takes time and caring to really love! It takes mercy!

 
Along the straight and narrow path there always seems to be bumps and curves as we try to mirror the life of Christ. For someone to say that they are a Christian is to acknowledge that in life, they try to walk the line or it is say that they seek righteousness. The Lenten season offers many opportunities for sacrifice and plenty of paths for us to walk the line of righteousness. I have often said, what in the world is keeping us away? Well it is the world and its’ golden emptiness that seduces us away from the warm loving embrace of our Creator.

 
Great Lent offers each one of us a personal spiritual renewal. It is a time of struggle for us physically and spiritually. During this time of struggle we tell our stomachs no and we tell the world no, and Christ reappears as a priority in our lives. It is during this time that we embrace the words of Johnny Cash and say: I walk the line, because Jesus is mine!

 
Visit the shut-ins, volunteer at the soup kitchens and help your neighbor! And when that final time comes and we encounter our last judgment, will Jesus be ours and a life eternal or will it be obvious that we instead chose to serve the world and ourselves? “For narrow is the gate and straitened is the way that leadeth away to life, and few are they who find it. [Mt. 7:14]

Fr. Gabriel Weller 2-19-2017

85 lbs of baggage

I just returned from a week-long trip cross country and I drug 85 lbs of “necessary” luggage with me. It was a trip in which I needed to portray two separate identities, one as an electronic security professional and one as an eternal security clergy member of the Orthodox Church. airport bagBoth of these careers require me to dress in a certain manner and have a different style of work clothes. When I arrived at the airport, the TSA folks x-rayed and sniffed the suitcases for everyone’s safety. My little carry-on roller was free but my large suitcase cost me a twenty-five dollar fee. I took 85 lbs of baggage with me and returned with more stuff than I took!

 
Just as the airline charges me for extra baggage, in life there is a cost for maintaining all of my junk. I always seem to drag along with me scars and soreness from the past. It seems as though wherever I go and whatever I do, I am somewhat entangled with my history. My actions and reactions are mostly based upon my learned survival experiences. Even in my marriage I sometimes enter into my combat mode because a memory of hurt or distrust is still embedded in my heart and usually has nothing to do with my wife but, there it is, overreaction! Fight or flight!

 
Over the years I have been able to be rid of some of my unwanted baggage by means of confession, communion, prayer and forgiveness. But now, a year older and even more snow on my roof I still have a lot more stuff to surrender. I want to be dependent on Jesus but I seem to keep one hand clinging to my carry-on baggage.

 
As we enter into the Lenten season I ask this question, how much baggage are you dragging around? Why do we find comfort in own pity party? When I was younger and stronger, I never gave it a second thought to the amount of extra weight I was dragging around. But now I am beginning to realize how tiring it is and how much precious time I have been wasting. Remembering wrongs only injures my ability to be about my Father’s business. “Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall affliction, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or danger, or sword?” [Rom. 8:35]

 
If I continue to choose to limit my understanding of love based upon what I have experienced here on Earth I will be cheating myself of becoming the man God has called me to be. Instead of loving others as Christ does, my choice to treasure and continue to drag the baggage of mine and others sinfulness cripples my salvific attempt to draw near to the One who truly cherishes me. ‘God, be gracious to me the sinner.’ [Lk. 18:13]

Fr. Gabriel Weller 2/5/2017